Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Picking up where we left off...


Capt. Hook in progress, 4" x 4"

Once the paper was stretched and completely dry, I taped the borders using white artist's tape. The idea is to give a clean border, but paint always manages to sneak underneath the tape in some places. Still, it gives me a reasonably tidy edge.

You can see that I've masked a few areas -- a large section along the beak and smaller dots that will become the centers of highlights. I used Winsor-Newton colorless masking fluid which I started using after reading a post by Connie Williams on masking techniques. I have to give a shout out to Connie -- although I've been using masking fluid for ages, I learned several valuable tricks from her tutorial. I absolutely love the Winsor-Newton product, although my old favorite -- Incredible White Mask -- is still the perfect choice for some of the abstract work I do. (A note about brushes for masking fluid. I like Cheap Joe's Uggly brushes, but you can use any inexpensive synthetic brush. I find the white synthetic brushes are best. For some reason, they withstand the masking fluid better than standard tan brushes. I always use dish detergent to prep the brush and I rinse it frequently in a bucket of soapy water.)

I've also put in the first pass on the body color. This is the point at which I invariably despair, but I know from experience that I can resolve the problems with further washes.

See you soon with the next installment.

14 comments:

  1. 'Mornin' Chris
    Here's a tip I learned from Nick Simmons :
    After you tape the borders, go around the edges with with masking fluid. Just a tiny line that overlaps the tape and the paper. It prevents the paint from seeping under the tape.
    Don't forget to do the corners where the tapes intersect. This works for masking out larger areas in the painting too so you don't use up so much fluid.

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  2. Thanks for the suggestions, Janet, but since I always mat my pieces before framing, I'm not too concerned with the paint that sneaks under the tape. And because I've found that masking fluid changes the surface of the paper just slightly, I have always masked even large areas with masking fluid alone.

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  3. I like the step by step shots. Can't wait to see the finished product!

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  4. Thanks, Jeb. This is a bit of an experiment for me, so I'm glad to hear you like it.

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  5. I LOVE step by steps. Yours is looking already nice and I will come back and see what happens more. Thank you also for mentioning the colourless masking fluid and the post by Connie Williams.

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  6. Thanks, Doris!! You're welcome for the masking information. I can't say enough good things about Connie's tutorial -- it's simply excellent.

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  7. Really enjoying your step by step, Chris. Must find this masking fluid tutorial you mention. Can I ask (late!) why you draw before stretching rather than afterwards? Is there an advantage you find?

    Hope things work out with your dad ok.

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  8. Thanks, Tracy!! Just click on Connie's name to go to the tutorial.

    I trace the image before I stretch the paper because I didn't like any of the methods using transfer paper -- the waxy stuff left nasty lines and the graphite paper seemed to rub off everywhere. I used to turn my drawing over and retrace the lines on the back with soft pencil, but it didn't always transfer well and it often left a mess on my watercolor paper.

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  9. Hi Chris, thanks for sharing..! I'm following your painting steps.You've described it very well. I'm waiting for the next steps. Hope your dad is ok.!

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  10. Thanks, Fábio!! Glad you like it.

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  11. Thanks for the explaination Chris. silly me found the tutorial! Doh!

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  12. We all have days like that!! Sometimes I think I have more than my share, but so it goes...

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